evocation table

evocation table

Monday, October 13, 2014

MAGICAL SERVICES





Fairly recently I began offering magical services in the area of magical consulting, spellwork, and talisman/implement constructing.

In the past years I have enjoyed speaking with those who have come seeking my perspective on matters which typically relate to the magical grimoires and their practice. Although I in no way consider my viewpoint and experience the end all to classical magical working, I am happy to share what I have learned with those who value my time.



A major reason why I have not blogged much in the last year or so is greatly due to my schedule filling up beyond belief. Besides writing books and tiredly continuing my own magical rituals, more and more eager magicians have come to me asking my assistance and feedback regarding their own work. A few have commissioned me to create magical items for them that they themselves do not have the skill or time to make themselves. I found I have enjoyed doing this for the individuals who truly appreciate what I do and the time and effort which goes into my magical work.



Those who know me and know my work, KNOW that I take magical pursuits very seriously and am not interested in cutting corners on conducting rituals, striving for unambiguous results, and conducting rituals with the proper implements and paraphernalia. In the area of classical magical I have a very particular approach and have realized I am not the only one.



For those of you on the path of traditional western ceremonial/ritual magick, the Solomonic strain of grimoric evocation/invocation, and conjuration, if there is a matter you think I could help you with then you may wish to consider the following services I am now providing:





Magical consulting price list:

-For Skype or other visual/audio media conference: $125.00 per hour.

-For Instant Messaging over Social media: $90.00 per hour.

- For email assistance and correspondence for your particular issue, price will be adjusted based on length of teaching/coaching, and feedback etc.

- Spellwork will be considered and priced after initial inquiry and consideration of your request. I am unlikely to assist anyone who is wishing to manipulate another, bring them under your control, put a love or hex on anyone or other such nonsense. If your motivations and reasons for magic are in any way suspect I will most likely not take your case.



Making veritable magical implements is also my forte as I have made countless vestments, implements, and other such items used in ceremonial magick based from the Solomonic strain of ceremonial magic. If you need an Item based of the Key of Solomon, The Lesser Key or Lemegeton, Heptomeron, Grimorium Verum, The Grand Grimoire, The Grimoire of Pope Honorius, etc. I have either made them already or could make them as they are specified in the actual grimoire. My abilities and expertise are not limited to the above works of magic however so if you are interested in an art or implement outside of this realm feel free to inquire.

I also have made the ritual items for DSIC as I describe in my book, Gateways Through Stone and Circle not only for myself but for other serious magicians as well. 



Many if not most grimoric items are quite difficult to make properly. The materials which go into them are typically expensive and difficult to come by as well. I time the crafting of such implements seriously and will adhere to the times and planetary alignments listed in the Key of Solomon if they are not specifically listed in the grimoire  they originate from.

For the Art of DRAWING SPIRITS INTO CRYSTALS (DSIC):

For the Ebony Pedestal: $900.00  (Materials: Black ebony wood, 24k gold leafing and symbols, 18k gold filled plate and %100 quartz crystal sphere.




For the Holy Table: $200.00 on round  wood disk of 1 1/2" to 3" engraved and painted. (Wax or metal Holy table will be priced differently depending on type of material desired.



Ebony wand made to your specifications of dimensions, length and lettering: $300.00 

(ebony wood, 24k gold leafing.)



Magic circle painted on canvas (DSIC)  

5" diameter : $125.00

8" diameter : $180.00

9" diameter: $260.00





Talismans as from the Key of Solomon:





(Price of Talisman will be determined by material used, difficulty, size and method of construction.)





If you are looking for a magical item which is not mentioned in the above, email me with as much detail as you are looking for and I will quote you a price.









 LARGE 18" diameter Scrying Mirror of The Moon with stand: $300.00




 For Any of the above services, contact me at:
BryanAshen@yahoo.com or find me on Face Book: Frater Ashen Chassan.




Thursday, September 11, 2014

So an interesting follow up to my post I did shortly after I moved into my new house: http://bryanashen.blogspot.com/2013_08_01_archive.html
 


 It’s hard to believe it has been over a year! And What a year! I was so worried that my smaller magical room would dampen or dissuade me from consistent magical working …and boy was I wrong. Hands down, the most successful magical operations I have conducted to date has been in my “new” magical chamber. The modest sized room has been the location for the majority of the material which my next book will be about. Archangels, spirit kings, ghosts and elementals, all contacted in no subtle way in that room. Funny how things work out. Not only did I have a suitable place for magical workings, I also received first hand results on how a house and area can indeed be cleared by magical, albeit holy workings.
 
A quick synopsis for those not wanting to read or reread my post about clearing the house after we first moved in: The very night of the move we immediately began having haunting type activity to the point where no one could sleep very well and my wife demanded I do a clearing as soon as possible. Well after a rather intense room to room clearing with magical sword,…and an unexpected encounter with an elongated spirit with blurred, milky white features who demanded I “get all my stuff out”,… it turns out the back-story would right around the corner.
 
Several months ago, my wife pulled up in front of our house to find one of those plastic and fabric flowers near a tree in our front yard with a message attached t it. The message was an obvious note to someone who had passed away and how much the one who left the flower had missed them. A bit of research done by my wife found the name written on the note matching a one of a previous owner of the house and also a news article. The article outlined a tragedy in which some sort of conflict had broken out where the now deceased man had been in angered state and was firing off rounds in the backyard when police were called. The details which ensued afterward are vague but resulted in the man being shot and killed in the backyard, our backyard now.
 
Several months after finding the flower and news article my scryer and I were in my magical chamber talking to my –fm- house spirit at its request. My –fm- spirit mentioned to us that the man who had been shot and killed in our backyard should be “called, given a  blessing, and reassessed” at some point in the near future. I thought this was interesting albeit a bit random concerning the main topic we were talking to the spirit for. Also, the spirit thing that appeared (right in my face) didn’t want to talk or reason with me but jest kept issuing orders so I had to send it on its merry-astral way. My –fm- spirit which came along later (and shall be another post), mentioned that it was not a deceased person but a being that came in “from the land” and was rather disliking of people but apparently enjoyed making them angry, spooked, irritable, and so on.
 
Ironically (or not) my wife and I were contacted by the deceased man’s mother who also lived in the house less than a week later. Apparently she wanted to know if we would allow her in the backyard with some specialist to go over the details of her son’s death and see if there was any provable discrepancies on the side of the officer shooting and killing her son. She also left her number and asked if either my wife or I could call and speak with her concerning this. My wife called the next day and had a rather interesting conversation with the woman.. She at first spoke about the history and the fact that her son had been shot and killed there and was apologetic to break the news to us to which my wife said that she had already found out and was aware of the situation. The woman went on to ask my wife if we had “experienced any unusual phenomena” and described how she had always hear footsteps, find windows in the downstairs open, and other unusually occurrences. Besides this she also remarked how the family were always fighting, how there was always a tension in the air there. My wife said that there had been occurrences but that her husband was sort of an expert in this area and knew how to get rid of it and that the house was peaceful.  …Apparently this woman had already done a bit of background checking on both myself and my wife and found out that I’m a magician  :-0… (it’s really not hard to do these days…ohh well)  Luckily she was not antagonistic towards me or my wife knowing this fact and actually delighted to hear that I had done something about the haunting. I continue to find it rather amusing how the realities of my life tend to play out like a not so boring paranormal occult novel. Not that I’m complaining, but it does make you shake your head and smile at just how interesting life can be and how very few would ever believe it.

Sunday, July 20, 2014

The Shaman Experience


 I decided to spend the 4th of July a bit differently than I had in the past. It was one of the rare times where id did not see or hear a single firework, did not hear our nation’s national anthem or the “ohhh” and “ahhhs” of a multitude of people as bright explosions of color occurred overhead. Instead I arrived in Florissant with my best friend and his family members to attend a rare ceremony. A woman by the name of Maile Lama, was going to perform a traditional Healing and Divining Ceremony. Maile Lama is a Shaman of Nepal and had never had a formal education but was instead trained as a shaman since she was around eight years old. This woman was not an outsider curious to learn shamanism after being raised in a modern civilization, she was born into the culture and tradition she practiced. As far a “pure” magician and seer, completely immersed in a tradition this was as close as anyone could get and rare opportunity for me.
We arrived far up in the mountains in the early evening with light rain coming down. After warm greetings and introductions from the host and several other attendees, we made our way up to the top of a hill where a large fire circle was built and places to sit. Maile Lama sat next to her translator and another assistant awaiting the rest of the gathering. The shaman woman who looked to be in her early 60’s or late 50’s was introduced by the translator and the nights proceedings were explained. Before long, Maile Lama began to drum and the drumming lasted for quite a time. I kept my senses open to absorb everything I could from senses, to opening my inner vision to see if I could catch glimpses of her ancestors and helpers spirits as she called them to joint eh circle. Before long the drumming had me in deep trance and I lost track of time and what I was even doing. I saw wisps of light move around the circle, the rains and the winds seemed to calm down and I could feel the thrum of the ceremonial drum from the earth beneath me and extend through my body. From what my sense were able to communicate to my intellect, it seemed that the drumming and chanting formed a perfect cord of frequency extending beyond time and distance to link directly to her ancestors, spirits and god-forms who had helped them to bring them into that space and time in no subtle way. The rhythm, the words, the motions, the mind of the shaman all linked from, her to the energies she contacted and desired to bring into that space. IT was a language that the surrounding forests and rocks knew, it was a pattern of energy agreeable and familiar yet unique. My instincts told me there was no part of the ceremony simply for sensation or show. Each ingredient seem to bring about the desired effects in the most harmonious way possible.


The ceremony reached a climax where Maile Lama, chanted and danced around the fire pit with very intentional practiced movements. As soon as the drumming ceased the entire atmosphere seemed to hum with the same harmonious frequency, ...as if a sandbox, made with chaotic images and sculptures were shaken till all that remained was uniform smooth, and an undisturbed level of sand. Everyone seemed to mirror this same feeling as I came gently out of the deep drumming trance and looked around. At some point in the midst of the ceremony the shaman invited those in need or want of healing to come forward, one at a time. For each individual healing she seemed to move intrinsically to the correct spaces and the person responded in turn. IT was very involved and intricate, taking several minutes to complete. Her use of the ritual implements, drum, ash, incense, water, all familiar in many respects and fascinating to me. Even though I didn’t feel like I had any major health concerns at the time, I went up to receive a healing nonetheless and experience what I could. Closing my eyes and opening my senses I could feel the motions and touch of the ritual daggers, drum and ash, all making my inner sight and senses tingle and at some points I even got senses of vertigo as things seem to realign within me. I felt “lighter” afterwards with a sense of peace and very thankful for the entire experience. Offerings and prayers were made to the fire before the final closing ceremonies and the entire event wrapped up perfectly as the night deepened. All in all a very interesting and worthwhile experience for me and I was grateful for the opportunity.

Friday, December 6, 2013

The “WIZARD’S” HAT




"And now we come to treat of the Consecrations which, men ought to make upon all instruments and things necessary to be used in this Art: and the virtue of this Consecration most chiefly consists in two things; to wit, in the power of the person consecrating, and by the virtue of the prayer by which the Consecration is made. For in the person consecrating, there is required holiness of Life, and power of sanctifying: both which are acquired by Dignification and Initiation. And that the person himself should with a firm and undoubted faith believe the virtue, power, and efficacie hereof. And then in the Prayer itself by which this Consecration is made, there is required the like holiness; which either solely consisteth in the prayer itself, as, if it be by divine inspiration ordained to this purpose, such as we have in many places of the holy Bible; or that it be hereunto instituted through the power of the Holy Spirit, in the ordination of the Church. Otherwise there is in the Prayer a Sanctimony, which is not only by itself, but by the commemoration of holy things; as, the commemoration of holy Scriptures, Histories, Works, Miracles, Effects, Graces, Promises, Sacraments and Sacramental things, and the like. Which things, by a certain similitude, do seem properly or improperly to appertain to the thing consecrated."    -Agrippa’s Fourth Book of Occult Philosophy

The master of the art should have a crown made of virgin paper… -The Key of Solomon

The other materials are a scepter or sword; a miter or cap, a long white robe of linen, with shoes and other clothes for this purpose. – The Lemgeton (Goetia)


The “WIZARD’S” HAT

"How dare she!!"
I decided to add another section for magical tool/vestment creation. Due in part to a continued observance to Solomonic ritual magick and those who are interested in pursuing it in a more traditional way, and also as an enjoy jib toward a newly acquired magical acquaintance who just LOVES “overdressed over ego'ed wannabe powerful magicians!!” ;-)


HISTORY:

The mitre (/ˈmaɪtər/; Greek: μίτρα, "headband" or "turban"), also spelled miter, is a type of headgear now known as the traditional, ceremonial head-dress of bishops and certain abbots in the Roman Catholic Church, as well as in the Anglican Communion, some Lutheran churches, and also bishops and certain other clergy in the Eastern Orthodox churches, Eastern Catholic Churches and the Oriental Orthodox Churches. The Metropolitan of the Malankara Mar Thoma Syrian Church also wears a mitre during important ceremonies such as the Episcopal Consecration.”
“The word μίτρα, mítra, (or, in its Ionic form, μίτρη, mítrē) first appears in Greek and signifies either of several garments: a kind of waist girdle worn under a cuirass, as mentioned in Homer's Iliad; a headband used by women for their hair; a sort of formal Babylonian head dress, as mentioned by Herodotus (Histories 1.195 and 7.90). The former two meanings have been etymologically connected with the word μίτος, mítos, "thread", but the connection is tenuous at best; the latter word is probably a loan from Old Persian.
The priestly mitre or turban (Hebrew mitznefet מִצְנֶפֶת) was the head covering worn by the Jewish High Priest when he served in the Tabernacle and the Temple in Jerusalem.
The Hebrew word mitznefet (מִצְנֶפֶת) has been translated as "mitre" (KJV) or "headdress". It was most likely a "turban", as the word comes from the root "to wrap".
The turban worn by the High Priest was much larger than the head coverings of the priests and wound so that it formed a broad, flat-topped turban, resembling the blossom of a flower. The head covering of the priests was different, being wound so that it formed a cone-shaped turban, and called a migbahat.
The priestly crown (Hebrew tzitz צִיץ "blossom" "flower") was attached to the turban by means of two sets of blue cords: one going over the top of the head and the other around the sides of the head at the level of the ears (Exodus 39:31).
The camelaucum (Greek: καμιλαύκιον, kamilaukion), the headdress both the mitre and the Papal tiara stem from, was originally a cap used by officials of the Imperial Byzantine court. "The tiara [from which the mitre originates] probably developed from the Phrygian cap, or frigium, a conical cap worn in the Graeco-Roman world. In the 10th century the tiara was pictured on papal coins."
Worn by a bishop, the mitre is depicted for the first time in two miniatures of the beginning of the eleventh century. The first written mention of it is found in a Bull of Pope Leo IX in the year 1049. By 1150 the use had spread to bishops throughout the West; by the 14th century the tiara was decorated with three crowns.
In its modern form in Western Christianity, the mitre is a tall folding cap, consisting of two similar parts (the front and back) rising to a peak and sewn together at the sides. Two short lappets always hang down from the back.

In the Catholic Church, the right to wear the mitre is confined by Canon law to bishops and to abbots, as it appears in the ceremony of consecration of a bishop and blessing of an abbot. Cardinals are now normally supposed to be bishops (since the time of Pope John XXIII), but even cardinals who are not bishops and who have been given special permission by the pope to decline consecration as bishops may wear the mitre. Other prelates have been granted the use of the mitre by special privilege, but this is no longer done, except in the case of an Ordinary of a Personal Ordinariate (even if he is a priest only). Former distinctions between "mitred abbots" and "non-mitred abbots" have been abolished.
The most typical mitre in the Eastern Orthodox and Byzantine Catholic churches is based on the closed Imperial crown of the late Byzantine Empire. Therefore, it too is ultimately based on the older καμιλαύκιον although it diverged from the secular headdress at a much later date, after it had already undergone further development. The crown form was not used by bishops until after the fall of Constantinople (1453).

The Eastern mitre is made in the shape of a bulbous crown, completely enclosed, and the material is of brocade, damask or cloth of gold. It may also be embroidered, and is often richly decorated with jewels. There are normally four icons attached to the mitre (often of Christ, the Theotokos, John the Baptist and the Cross), which the bishop may kiss before he puts it on. Eastern mitres are usually gold, but other liturgical colours may be used.

The mitre is topped by a cross, either made out of metal and standing upright, or embroidered in cloth and lying flat on the top. In Greek practice, the mitres of all bishops are topped with a standing cross. The same is true in the Russian tradition. Mitres awarded to priests will have the cross lying flat. Sometimes, instead of the flat cross, the mitre may have an icon on the top.
Elaborately embroidered Eastern Orthodox mitre, 1715.

As an item of Imperial regalia, along with other such items as the sakkos (Imperial dalmatic) and epigonation, the mitre came to signify the temporal authority of bishops (especially that of the Patriarch of Constantinople) within the administration of the Rum millet (i.e., the Christian community) of the Ottoman Empire. The mitre is removed at certain solemn moments during the Divine Liturgy and other services, usually being removed and replaced by the protodeacon.
The use of the mitre is a prerogative of bishops, but it may be awarded to archpriests, protopresbyters and archimandrites. The priestly mitre is not surmounted by a cross, and is awarded at the discretion of a synod of bishops.”



The Solomonic Magus cap, mitre or crown.

The KoS and Lemegeton calls for a head piece to be worn during magical evocation. Such ritual attire is noted elsewhere but you get your most detailed instructions in the KoS:

Besides this, the master of the art should have a crown made of virgin paper, upon the which should be written these four names:&mdash JEHOVA, in front; ADONAI behind; EL on the right; and GIBOR on the left. These names should be written with the ink and pen of the art, whereof we shall speak in the proper chapter. The disciples should also each have a crown of virgin paper whereon these divine symbols should be marked in scarlet. 


       Note:  “Aub24 and K288. EL GIBOR is Hebrew for "mighty God". For some reason Mathers silently departs from the manuscripts, reading: "YOD, HE, VAU, HE, in front; ADONAI behind; EL on the right; and ELOHIM on the left." Ad. 10862 reads, "inscribe these four names: Adonaÿ, Jeova, Il, Gabor." Ad. 36674: "...AGAA; AGAY; AGALTHA* [In Marg: *Aglatha]; AGLAOTH." –JHP
 

The Goetia just mentions a cap or miter which can be your standard linen Catholic Miter (mitra simplex), Jewish turban miter, or probably any significant clerical headdress of the western granted that it’s white and should be of a similar material composition as the robe.
A great way to utilize the holy names from the KoS and personal headdress style is to choose a portion of white linen or silk material (possibly the same that was used to make your robe) and attach (sew) the parchment crown to the base of the material.

So to create this magical headpiece vestment you would want to first select a piece of parchment and consecrate it towards its use. Measure the circumference of your head and allow a small bit of extra space and get an idea of where you would like the crown/miter to sit on your head. You can experiment a bit with this by using regular paper cut into strips to get it right before cutting the parchment. Once you have the length, space out the holy names to your liking so they evenly reflect the front, back, and two sides of your head. I use the red cinnabar ink that is useed for magick sigils and holy names for my BOS separated by black crosses with the black ink. This forms a nice little “magic circle” directly around your most centered and important magical tool. You’ll obviously want a bit of extra material so you can attach (sew) the parchment together making small holes and perhaps using a bit of white or red silk thread. However…if your adding the silk or linen headdress piece, don’t sew it together quite yet.

The next part will be to decide what sort of magician or wizard hat you want to have. The classical cone shape is easiest and can be seen with good examples of the “conjures” found in Esoteric Archives and included in the front of Peterson’s Lemegeton book. It’s your classical wizard’s hat with the conical shape and buffer brim near the forehead. There are two basic ways to make this one: 1. Simply cut out a triangle with the base measuring just past (enough to sew) the measurement of the length of your crown parchment. The length can be about any you desire, although I think it looks silly if it is too tall. About 5 to 7 inches is plenty and will give it more height than you can initially tell. Once you have this, simply fold the fabric in two and stitch up one side of the length. 2. Cut two pieces of fabric the base of which measures half the length of your original parchment and sew up the two sides of the length.




















Another version you can use is almost like the chef’s hat or turban where it puffs out on the sides. This one can be a bit more complicated to sew in order for it to look nice, but the best way I’ve found is to cut several small triangles together so that they form a natural dome around the top and once that is done, sew the top together. Don’t forget to turn the fabric “inside out” so that the proper shape can be seen with the rough sewn edges hidden in the inside of the hat.
Once the basic pattern for the linen or silk is sewn, you’ll want to attach it to the parchment crown in two ways. First, you’ll want to sew or otherwise attach the crown with a small part of the fabric of the hat showing at the bottom. Next, you’ll want to sew the top fabric part together, do one more check on how it will fit on your head, mark it and then sew the fabric and crown “ring” together. The last part will be to sew or attach the small piece of fabric around at the very bottom part of the sharp parchment crown to create a soft buffer.

 










There! Your basic Solomonic magical hat is complete! If you so desire, you can also attach lappets or strips of material 2-3 inches wide and roughly a foot long on the back. To do this you would want to sew them directly to the parchment and material if possible. Tassels can be added on the end for the complete fancy show. As most of you have seen, I added the All Seeing Eye to my first miter and also the planetary and astrological sign symbols to my lappets on the underside, and additional Hexagrams of Solomon to the backs. All personal touches and not needed. I advise consecrating the magical hat when it’s completed in addition to anointing the forehead before serious magical operations as these further sacraments will only further the “fire in the head” that is generated by the ceremonial magician.